Hawaiian Royalty

                   
  1795-1819 King Kamehameha I
Kamehameha the Great
(The Lonely One)
Lived 1738-1819

The warrior king who unified the Hawaiian Islands in 1810.

By developing alliances with the major Pacific colonial powers, Kamehameha preserved Hawai`i's independence under his rule. Kamehameha is remembered for the Law of the Splintered Paddle, which protects human rights of non-combatants in times of battle. His full Hawaiian name is Kalani Paiea Wohi o Kaleikini Keali`ikui Kamehameha o `Iolani i Kaiwikapu kaui Ka Liholiho Kunuiakea.

Kamehameha's Keawe Genealogy

Kamehameha's Rise to Power

Kamehameha The Great

 
 

 

 

 
         
  Queen Ka`ahumanu
Lived 1772-1832

"The Favorite Wife" of Kamehameha I was his constant companion and the only of his wives who met with foreigners. When he died, she became regent of Liholiho, then of his successor Kauikeaouli; she remarried, to Kaumualii, the governor of Kauai.

Kaahumanu, the "Feather Mantle"

The Woman Who Changed a Kingdom





 

 
 
 
         
  Keopuolani
Lived 1778-1823

Kamehameha Ist's "Sacred Wife," was mother to the heirs apparent, Liholiho and Kauikeaouli.

Keopuolani, the "Gathering Of The Clouds Of Heaven"

 

 


 

 
         
  1819-1824 King Kamehameha II
Liholiho
Lived 1797-1824

Died of measles in London on a visit to meet England's King George. News of his death did not reach Hawaii until 1825.

Liholiho Ascends the Throne

 

 


 

 

   
         
  Queen Kamamalu
Victoria Kamamalu
Lived 1802-1824

She was the eldest daughter and second child of Queen Kalakua Kaheiheimalie and King Kamehameha I. Kamamalu died of measles with her husband in London.

 

 

 

   
         
  1825-1854 King Kamehameha III
Kauikeaouli
Lived 1813-1854

Became king upon Liholiho's death at age 10. He gained full control after regents Ka`ahumanu, then Kinau (a wife of Liholiho), died.

His reign was the longest of any Hawaiian monarch. He was king at a difficult period in Hawaiian history. In his time Hawaii moved from kingship to constitutional monarchy. Yearning for a return to old ways, he also rehabilitated hula dancing which had been abolished by the first missionaries.

 




 

 
         
  Queen Kalama
Lived 1817-1870

She was the daughter of Naihekukui, a minor Kona Chief, and Chiefess I`ahu`ula. Her father was commander of the native Hawaiian fleet at Honolulu.






 

 

 

   
         
  1855-1863 King Kamehameha IV
Alexander Liholiho
Lived
1834-1863

The grandson of Kamehameha I and the adopted son of Kamehameha III.





 





 

 

   
         
  Queen Emma Kalanikaumaka
Lived 1836-1885

She was the adopted daughter of Britisher Dr. Thomas Rooke, grandniece of Kamehameha I and granddaughter of his adviser, Englishman John Young.

 

 

 

 

 

   
                   
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